222014Feb
Be Wery, wery Qwiet. I’m Hunting Wabbit.

Be Wery, wery Qwiet. I’m Hunting Wabbit.

In a lot of small Australian towns in the mid to late 20th century, there was not a lot to do, unless you played sport.

In winter, it was soccer, Rugby League or Aussie Rules, while in summer it was cricket or touch footy… and the river, lake or beach. Wearing a hat was never really an option with the football codes, except in soccer where the goalkeeper could sometimes wear a cap. For cricket, it was again a cap until the wonderful “Greg Chappell” hat was released.

Greg Chappell did more for Australia than he realised when he first wore that broad-brimmed white hat onto a cricket field as Australia’s cricket captain. If it was good enough for the Aussie Captain, then it was good enough for anyone. Except that Chappelli still wore the “baggy green” when he batted. So, naturally, did most cricketers. Usually it was just a baseball cap.

Now the baggy cap or baseball cap was as good at protecting batsmen from bouncers, as it was from protecting them from the sun…

Fast forward to nearly 30 years later and a course of Aldara cream applied to the forehead of a once young cricketer to flush out any BCC’s, would reveal what has become known as the “Baseball Cap” Pattern… and that pattern related directly to the use of caps. Both temples and the outsides of both eyebrows might be now covered in skin cancers and it is abundantly clear that cricketers may have been better off not wearing a hat at all. At least then, they might have lathered themselves with sunscreen. I understand from one high ranking pace bowler that sunscreen when liberally applied to the forehead can be handy in making the ball swing if you used the sweat from your brow…

At least they didn’t wear the cap backwards…

Nowadays, the widest brimmed Akubra is the first thing you should grab before you walk outside.

Ditch the cap, be Australian and wear an Akubra, which are made from Rabbits fur. Then Elmer Fudd can go hunting wabbits…